Andy Warhol - Campbells Soup Can | Beef

Andy Warhol - Campbells Soup Can | Beef

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This framed open edition print by Andy Warhol titled 'Campbells Beef Soup' is a Sunday B. Morning Silkscreen print produced with archival inks on museum board.  It has been stamped in blue on the back and comes with COA from Sunday B. Morning.

Framed size: 1010 x 710mm.

Andy Warhol famously appropriated familiar images from consumer culture and mass media, among them celebrity and tabloid news photographs, comic strips, and, in this work, the widely consumed canned soup made by the Campbell’s Soup Company. 

Warhol mimicked the repetition and uniformity of advertising by carefully reproducing the same image across each individual canvas. He varied only the label on the front of each can, distinguishing them by their variety. 

Towards the end of 1962, shortly after he completed Campbell’s Soup Cans, Warhol turned to the photo-silkscreen process. A printmaking technique originally invented for commercial use, it would become his signature medium and link his art making methods more closely to those of advertisements. “I don’t think art should be only for the select few,” he claimed, “I think it should be for the mass of the American people.”

In 1970 Warhol began discussions with two anonymous Belgian friends with the idea behind this partnership being a commentary on mass production - one of the themes of Warhol’s art. At some point during these talks, the collaboration (named ‘Sunday B Morning’) fell apart, for reasons that remain unknown. But by this point, the Belgians already had the original Factory photo negatives (which the stencils are made from) and the colour codes required to make the stencils and the prints. ‘Sunday B Morning’ began printing regardless and the prints were released in 1970 with a black stamp on the back that read ‘Fill In Your Own Signature’. There is a debate as to whether that idea was originally Warhol’s, and it seems likely given his ‘Famous for 15 minutes’ concepts. History also stands divided as to whether or not Warhol was pleased with the prints - it did after all, fit in with his ideas on mass production.